New Research Shows Colon Cancer Survival Rate at All-Time High

Colon cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in the United States, and it is also one of the most deadly. However, new research shows that the survival rate for colon cancer is at an all-time high.

The research, which was conducted by the American Cancer Society, looked at data from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. The data showed that the five-year survival rate for colon cancer has increased from 64.5 percent in 1975-1977 to 69.8 percent in 2011-2013. This is the highest five-year survival rate ever recorded for colon cancer.

The researchers also found that the five-year survival rate for colon cancer was higher for white patients than for black patients. The five-year survival rate for white patients was 71.2 percent, while the rate for black patients was only 62.7 percent.

The researchers believe that the increase in the survival rate is due to a number of factors, including improved screening and early detection, better treatments, and increased awareness of the disease.

Screening for colon cancer is recommended for all adults over the age of 50, and earlier if there is a family history of the disease. Early detection is key to successful treatment, as it allows for the cancer to be treated before it has spread to other parts of the body.

In addition, treatments for colon cancer have improved significantly in recent years. Newer treatments, such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies, have been shown to be more effective than traditional chemotherapy.

Finally, increased awareness of the disease has also helped to improve the survival rate. People are more likely to get screened if they know the risks and symptoms of colon cancer.

Overall, the new research shows that the survival rate for colon cancer is at an all-time high. This is due to improved screening, better treatments, and increased awareness of the disease. It is important to continue to raise awareness of the disease and to encourage people to get screened, as this will help to further improve the survival rate.